Last edited by Tygojar
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

6 edition of Sati - Widow Burning in India found in the catalog.

Sati - Widow Burning in India

by Sakuntal Narasimhan

  • 348 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Anchor .
Written in


The Physical Object
Number of Pages216
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7439862M
ISBN 100385423179
ISBN 109780385423175

Access to society journal content varies across our titles. If you have access to a journal via a society or association membership, please browse to your society journal, select an article to view, and follow the instructions in this box. Sati, the burning of a Hindu widow on her husband's funeral pyre, has always been a sensational issue and a highly controversial act. Always exceptional and effecting only a tiny minority of Hindu widows, it has remained close to the surface of social and political life and has played a disproportionately prominent role within Indian history and culture.

Sati: a writeup of Raja Ram Mohan Roy about burning of widows alive / [edited by] Mulk Raj Anand., Price: USD (DK (HBD)) Usually Ships In: 5 - 8 days.   During its peak, Sati claimed thousands of widow-burning every year. Some widows poisoned themselves before committing Sati. The practice of sati, however, spared pregnant widows. Some suggest that Sati might have inspired Catholic witch burnings. Official reports mention that around 30 cases of Sati were documented in India between and

T he legal debate in india over the worship and glorification of sati (widow burning, previously spelled “suttee”) stands unresolved at present. After several years of controversy, the practice of worshipping sati was made illegal in after the death of a young Rajput woman named Roop Kanwar. At that time the Indian government revised the colonial legislation banning widow immolation. "Contentious Traditions" analyzes the debate on sati, or widow burning, in colonial India. Though the prohibition of widow burning in was heralded as a key step forward for women's emancipation in modern India, Lata Mani argues that the women who were burned were marginal to the debate and that the controversy was over definitions of Hindu.


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Sati - Widow Burning in India by Sakuntal Narasimhan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sati--the burning of a widow on her husband's funeral pyre--has for centuries been one of the few ways in which women of India could achieve renown, respect, and even deification. This eye-opening work exposes what this still persistent ritual (officially outlawed in ) reveals about this society and about the women who choose or are forced to become sati.

8-page insert. It implies that widows are burned in India, but sati is clearly defined as a widow's self-immolation and self-sacrifice. The author adopts a secular, feminist position in discussing her topic.

This is a good book if you're looking for arguments against sati, but if you're seeking to understand sati in its religious and cultural context, this 4/5(2). Sati - Widow Burning in India book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.

Bombay journalist Narasimhan here offers an unnerving, caref 4/5. Suttee by James Atkinson,in the India Office Collection of the British Library (c) British Library Board In this age of ascending feminism and focus on equality and human rights, it is difficult to assimilate the Hindu practice of sati, the burning to death of a widow on her husband's funeral pyre, into our modern world.

Indeed, the practice is outlawed and illegal in today's. Sati: widow burning in India User Review - Not Available - Book Verdict. For years it was not uncommon for widows to be burned alive with the corpses of their husbands on funeral pyres in India. British officials prohibited the practice in the 19th century, but the Read full review.

About the Book. Contentious Traditions analyzes the debate on sati, or widow burning, in colonial the prohibition of widow burning in was heralded as a key step forward for women's emancipation in modern India, Lata Mani argues that the women who were burned were marginal to the debate and that the controversy was over definitions of Hindu tradition, the place of ritual in.

The princely states of India during that time were also pressurised to rule out sati completely. Prevention of Sati Act () Inin the village of Deorala in Rajasthan, an year-old married woman named Roop Kanwar was forced to become sati when her husband died after eight months of : Richa Jain.

Prevention of Sati Act. Today, India's Prevention of Sati Act () makes it illegal to coerce or encourage anyone to commit sati. Forcing someone to commit sati can be punished by death.

Nonetheless, a small number of widows still choose to join their husbands in death; at least four instances have been recorded between the year and   The practice of sati (widow burning) has been widespread in India since the reign of the Gupta Empire.

The practice of sati as is known today was first recorded in CCE in an ancient city in the state of Madhya Pradesh. Over time, this practice became widespread in northern and central India and especially among the Rajput, in the state of.

Sati - Widow Burning in India Sakuntala Narasimhan, Author Anchor Books $15 (p) ISBN Buy this book. Bombay journalist Narasimhan here offers an unnerving, carefully.

Publicity following the sati of an year-old widow led to the passage of the Sati Prevention Act, which not only bans the burning of widows but also imposes punishments for glorifying women who have died by means of sati.

Narasimhan, an Indian journalist, takes issue with pro-sati advocates who claim a religious underpinning to the Author: Sakuntal Narasimhan. Contentious Traditions analyzes the debate on sati, or widow burning, in colonial the prohibition of widow burning in was heralded as a key step forward for women's emancipation in modern India, Lata Mani argues that the women who were burned were marginal to the debate and that the controversy was over definitions of Hindu tradition, the place of ritual in religious worship.

Outlines the reasons that the officially outlawed practice of sati, the burning of widows, still persists in India, indicating that the traditional role of women in this culture has changed little Narasimhan delves into education, religion, compulsion, male chauvinism and the devaluation of women.

Publicity following the sati of an year-old widow led to the passage of the Sati Prevention Act, which not only bans the burning of widows but also imposes punishments for glorifying women who have died by means of sati. Narasimhan, an Indian journalist, takes issue with pro-sati advocates who claim a religious underpinning to the Pages: BOOKS: Burning issue of women’s rights By JOAN SMITH DEATH BY FIRE: Sati, Dowry Death and Female Infanticide in Modern India by Mala Sen The event that prompted Mala Sen to write this book took place in the north-western state of Rajasthan, which borders Pakistan, in An year-old woman, Roop Kanwar, whose husband had died suddenly, was burned [ ].

Sati: Widow Burning in India Hardcover – August 1, by V. N Datta (Author) › Visit Amazon's V. N Datta Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author.

Learn about Author Central. N Datta (Author)Author: V. N Datta. Sati: widow burning in India by Sakuntala Narasimhan, Publication date Topics Sati Publisher New York: Doubleday Collection 1st Anchor Books ed.

External-identifier urn:oclc:record Extramarc Princeton University Library Foldoutcount 0 Identifier satiwidowburning00sakuPages:   Sati- the widow burning culture is one of those. Sati or suttee is an ancient Indian practice in which a widow gets herself burnt to ashes during her late husband’s funeral pyre.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Sati, the Blessing and the Curse: The Burning of Wives in India by Oxford University Press Inc. The History of British India is a history of Company rule in India by the 19th century British historian and imperial political theorist James Mill.

This History went into many editions and during the 19th century became the standard reference work on its subject among British imperialists. Even when Raja Ram Mohan Roy and his Brahmo Samaj started advocating for the abolition of Sati inhe was met with intense opposition from certain sections of the dominant Hindu populations in Bengal and northern India.

While Tripathi claims that Sati was a minor practice relegated to medieval India, it has been documented that Roy was motivated to work for the abolition after .Additional Physical Format: Online version: Sakuntala Narasimhan, Sati, a study of widow burning in India.

New Delhi, India ; New York, U.S.A.: Viking, Although sati was officially outlawed inthe rite persists: the book points to the self-immolation of year-old Roop Kanwar in the presence of a crowd of 4, an act that incited nationwide pro- and anti-sati sentiment.